Mary Lou Williams , Motivational Bio 2022 – Saint Martin de Porres, Church Tribute!

Mary Lou Williams (born Mary Elfrieda Scruggs; May 8, 1910 – May 28, 1981) was an American jazz pianist, arranger, and composer. She wrote hundreds of compositions and arrangements and recorded more than one hundred records (in 78, 45, and LP versions). Williams wrote and arranged for Duke Ellington and Benny Goodman, and she was friend, mentor, and teacher to Thelonious Monk, Charlie Parker, Miles Davis, Tadd Dameron, Bud Powell, and Dizzy Gillespie.

In 1922, at the age of 12, she went on the Orpheum Circuit of theaters. During the following year she played with Duke Ellington and his early small band, the Washingtonians. One morning at three o’clock, she was playing with McKinney’s Cotton Pickers at Harlem’s Rhythm Club. Louis Armstrong entered the room and paused to listen to her. Williams shyly told what happened: “Louis picked me up and kissed me.

MARY LOU WILLIAMS: THE LADY WHO SWINGS THE BAND – AfricanFilm.com

In 1942, Williams left the Twelve Clouds of Joy, returning to Pittsburgh. She was joined there by her bandmate Harold “Shorty” Baker, with whom she formed a six-piece ensemble that included Art Blakey on drums. After getting engaged in Cleveland, Baker left to join Duke Ellington’s orchestra. Williams joined the band in New York City, and they traveled to Baltimore to be married. She traveled with Ellington and helped arrange several tunes for him, including “Trumpet No End” (1946), her version of “Blue Skies” by Irving Berlin.

Mary Lou Williams Foundation, Inc. - Posts | Facebook

Mary Lou Williams was an African American jazz pianist, composer, and arranger who wrote hundreds of compositions and arrangements and recorded over one hundred records. Williams was born as Mary Elfireda Scruggs on May 8, 1910 in Atlanta, Georgia, but grew up in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

After her hiatus, her first piece was a Mass that she wrote and performed named Black Christ of the Andes (1963). Two short works, Anima Christi and Praise the Lord, were also released during this time. Williams made great efforts to perform his work in collaboration with the Youth Choir, including the “Mass of Mary Lou” held at St. Patrick’s Cathedral in New York City in April 1975. The jazz musician played at the church for the first time. She established a charitable organization and opened thrift stores in Harlem, directing the proceeds, along with ten percent of her own earnings, to musicians in need. As a 1964 Time article explained, “Mary Lou thinks of herself as a soul musician — a way of saying that she never strays far from melody and the blues, but deals sparingly in gospel harmony and rhythm. “I pray with my fingers when I play,” she says. I achieve a good “soul sound” by touching people’s souls.

In the 1980 novel A Confederacy of Dunces, Ignatius Reilly contemplates praying to Martin for aid in bringing social justice to the black workers at the New Orleans factory where he works. And in music, the first track of jazz pianist Mary Lou Williams’s album Black Christ of the Andes is titled “St. Martin De Porres”.

There are several Spanish and Mexican works regarding his life in cinema and television, starring Cuban actor Rene Muñoz, most of them referring to his mixed race, his miracles and his life of humility. The best known movies are Fray Escoba (Friar Broom) (1963) and Un mulato llamado Martin (A mulatto called Martin) (1975).

Peter the Great, Motivational Bio – Breaking news 2022

Peter the Great, was the monarch of the Russian Emperor, May 7 Russian Empire [O.S. April 27] 1682, until his death in 1725, his brother Ivan 5 before 1696. It reigned jointly with the world. Under his rule, Russia was modernized and grew into a European power. Born: June 9, 1672, Moscow, Russia
Death: February 8, 1725, St. Petersburg, Russia Height: 2.03m

Major Accomplishments of Peter the Great

1 He initiated Russia’s westernization through his internal reforms.
2 He enhanced Russia’s economy by industrial growth.
3 Peter the Great implemented sweeping reforms in education.
4 He introduced the system of Table of Ranks to do away with hereditary nobility.
Peter the Great statue, Vladimir Putin’s gift to Londoners, damaged in attempted robbery
Russian embassy may be asked to pick up bill to repair tribute to Russian president’s hero, gifted during 2003 visit

Was Pyotr the Great cruel? Early in his rule, there was an uprising by the guards, which was mercilessly subdued. Peter the Great himself led five of the thousands of guards executed for treason. When it comes to punishment, Peter didn’t have a favorite. Even his son and his heirs were imprisoned and tortured.


Why is Peter called Great? After Russia won the Northern War, it became the strongest nation in Europe and became known as the Russian Empire. In October 1721, Peter the Great was awarded the title of Peter the Great, the father of his homeland and the emperor of all Russia.

UK relations with Russia and its leader have deteriorated sharply in the years since Putin sailed down the Thames in 2003 to visit the statue, accompanied by the Duke of York,. The Kremlin has deleted a press release about the visit but it is still available on a web archive.

The Russian Leader was travelling from Westminster to Greenwich on the Royal Nore to see the new statue of Peter the Great at Deptford Creek and visit the Observatory.

Putin_visit

Putin hails Peter the Great as a national hero for establishing Russia as a European power, and keeps a bronze statue of him in his cabinet room.

Walter Field, was a, British painter, Walterfeld, Biography

He was the youngest son of Edwin Wilkinsfield by his second wife, Leticia Kinder, and was born on December 1, 1837 in Windmill Hill, Hamstead. He was a direct descendant of Oliver Cromwell. After being educated at the University College School in London, he was taught painting at Chiaroscuro by John Rogers Herbert and the sculptor John Pai. He made art his profession, painting outdoor themes and landscapes, especially the landscape of the Thames countryside, often enlivened by well-painted figures. He also made some portraits. At first he worked chiefly in oil, but subsequently executed many drawings in watercolour. His landscapes and coast scenes show skilful technique.

A drinking fountain, now disused, was erected on Hampstead Heath to the memory of Walter Field

Between 1856 and 1901 he exhibited at the Old Water Colour Society (Royal Society of Painters in Water Colours), at the Royal Academy (where he showed fortytwo pictures), the British Institution (where he showed nine pictures), the Royal Society of British Artists, Dudley Gallery, and elsewhere. He was elected an associate of the Old Water Colour Society on 22 March 1880, but never attained full membership. He was also one of the earliest members of the Dudley Gallery, whose first exhibition was held in 1865.[1] Personal life A drinking fountain, now disused, was erected on Hampstead Heath to the memory of Walter Field[1] Field resided principally at Hampstead, and was untiring in his efforts for the preservation of the natural beauties of Hampstead Heath; he was the main founder of the Hampstead Heath Protection Society. By his wife, Mary Jane Cookson, whom he married on 14 May 1868, he had seven children.

They included Edwin Field, known as a rugby player. Field Starbucks 23rd AM. December 1901, at the Priors of East Heathrow.

Pinting by walter field

Tony Woods

Tony Woods is a stand-up comedian and comedy writer who has served as a mentor to Dave Chappelle and others.  He was a founding member of P. Diddy’s Bad Boys of Comedy and Russell Simmons’ Def Comedy Jam. 

Woods is a DC-area comedian who specialises in observational comedy in “a laid-back, meditative style, a mellow brand of cool,” according to the New York Times.

References
“He Helped Make Dave Chappelle Dave Chappelle”. The New York Times. 2019-10-30. Retrieved 2021-02-05.
“Tony Woods from HBO’s Def Comedy Jam, Comedy Central Presents & Funny or Die at Drafthouse Comedy in DC”. Drafthouse Comedy. 2018-04-13. Retrieved 2021-02-05.
“Interview with Comedian Tony Woods, FLOW Entertainment”. FLOW Entertainment Group, LLC. Retrieved 2021-02-05.
Tuccio-Koonz, Linda (2020-12-02). “Chappelle mentor Tony Woods at Bridgeport’s Stress Factory”. Connecticut Post. Retrieved 2021-02-05.
Fraley, Jason. “Tony Woods, DC comedy vet and Dave Chappelle mentor, cracks up Birchmere”. WTOP. Retrieved 5 February 2021.
Castleberry, Tony. “Comedian Tony Woods makes rare return to southeastern NC”. WECT. Retrieved 5 February 2021.

Tony Woods is a comedy writer and stand-up comedian known for being a mentor to Dave Chappelle and others. He was an original member of Russell Simmons’ Def Comedy Jam and P. Diddy’s Bad Boys of Comedy.

Linton Kwesi Johnson ,– Building alliances, – Positive role models 

Linton Kwesi Johnson (conceived 24 August 1952), otherwise called LKJ, is a Jamaican name artist and dissident who has been situated in the United Kingdom starting around 1963. In 2002 he turned into the second living artist, and the main dark writer, to be distributed in the Penguin Modern Classics series. His presentation verse includes the recitation of his own refrain in Jamaican patois over name reggae, generally written as a team with eminent British reggae maker/craftsman Dennis Bovell.


Johnson proceeded to read up for a degree in humanism at Goldsmiths College in New Cross, London, graduating in 1973. Talking in a 2018 meeting about his beginning as an artist, he said: “I started to compose section, since I preferred it, but since it was an approach to communicating the resentment, the energy of the young people of my age as far as our battle against racial abuse. Verse was a social weapon in the dark freedom battle, so that is the way it started. During the ahead of schedule to mid-1970s he was utilized as the main paid library assets and schooling official at the Keskidee Center, where his sonnet Voices of the residing and the dead was arranged, created by Jamaica writer Lindsay Barrett, with music by the reggae bunch Rasta Love. Johnson has reviewed: “it was awesome, you know, having composed something and having it organized with entertainers and performers. That was back in 1973 preceding I had a sonnet distributed anyplace. That was before anybody had known about Linton Kwesi Johnson.”

Johnson composed for New Musical Express, Melody Maker, and Black Music during the 1970s and keeping in mind that chipping away at an independent reason for Virgin Records during this period he composed accounts for reggae craftsmen on the name, just as sleeve notes and duplicate for adverts.

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Henry Moore & Reclining Figure, The arrangement of these three nude females recalls the traditional composition of ‘The Three Graces

Reclining Figure 1938 (LH 192) is a small sculpture by Henry Moore of an sinuous abstracted human figure. An enlarged version was made in 1984 for the Oversea-Chinese Banking Corporation, Singapore. The resulting Large Reclining Figure (LH 192b) is some 9 metres (30 ft) long, making it the largest sculpture made by Moore.

Photograph courtesy of Leeds Museums and Galleries

Reclining Figure

Date 1938 cast 1938-46 Artwork Catalogue NumberLH 192 cast a Media bronze Dimensions32.4 cmOwnershipLeeds City Art Galleries, bequest 1991 Collections

‘The Three Nymphs’, Aristide Maillol, 1930–8, cast 1937–8 | Tatehttps://www.tate.org.uk › art › artworks › maillol-the-th…
‘. However, Maillol insisted that they were three nymphs …

The Three Nymphs, Aristide Maillol | Miahttp://collections.artsmia.org › art › the-three-nymphs-a…
His Three Nymphs recall the Three Graces of Greek mythology … which also contrasted with the vigorous intensity and drama of Rodin’s or Degas’ sculptures.

Aeneas, Brutus, Brute of Troy,

Brutus, or Brute of Troy, is a legendary descendant of the Trojan hero Aeneas, known in medieval British history as the eponymous founder and first king of Britain. This legend first appears in the Historia Brittonum, an anonymous 9th-century historical compilation to which commentary was added by Nennius, but is best known from the account given by the 12th-century chronicler Geoffrey of Monmouth in his Historia Regum Britanniae.

“I am called the good Aeneas, known to fame Above the ether, who our household gods Snatched from our enemies, and in my fleet Convey. Italia, my ancestral land, And the race sprung from Jove supreme, I seek, With twice ten ships upon the Phrygian Sea, I, following my destinies, embarked, My divine mother showing me the way.”

Some have suggested that attributing the origin of ‘Britain’ to the Latin ‘Brutus’ may be ultimately derived from Isidore of Seville’s popular 7th-century work Etymologiae, in which it was speculated that the name of Britain comes from bruti, on the basis that the Britons were, in the eyes of that author, brutes, or savages. A more detailed story, set before the foundation of Rome, follows, in which Brutus is the grandson or great grandson of Aeneas — a legend that was perhaps inspired by Isidore’s spurious etymology and blends it with the Christian, pseudo-historical, “Frankish Table of Nations” tradition that emerged in the early medieval European scholarly world (actually of 6th century AD Byzantine origin, and not Frankish, according to historian Walter Goffart) and attempted to trace the peoples of the known world (as well as legendary figures, such as the Trojan house of Aeneas) back to Biblical ancestors.

“My sire Anchises’ troubled ghost affrights My dreams, and warns me. And then too my boy Ascanius and the injury I’ve done To his dear head, defrauding him of that Hesperian kingdom and those destined lands. Now too the messenger of the gods, sent down By Jove himself (I swear it by your life And mine), has brought his mandate through the air.”

Supposedly Following Roman sources such as Livy and Virgil, the Historia tells how Aeneas settled in Italy after the Trojan War, and how his son Ascanius founded Alba Longa, one of the precursors of Rome. Ascanius married, and his wife became pregnant. In a variant version, the father is Silvius, who is identified as either the second son of Aeneas, previously mentioned in the Historia, or as the son of Ascanius. A magician, asked to predict the child’s future, said it would be a boy and that he would be the bravest and most beloved in Italy. Enraged, Ascanius had the magician put to death. The mother died in childbirth.

Thomas Charles Llethbridge, – Philosophy, Ethnology and Archaeology.

Thomas Charles Lethbridge (23 March 1901 – 30 September 1971), better known as T. C. Lethbridge, was an English archaeologist, parapsychologist, and explorer. A specialist in Anglo-Saxon archaeology, he served as honorary Keeper of Anglo-Saxon Antiquities at the Cambridge University Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology from 1923 to 1957, and over the course of his lifetime wrote twenty-four books on various subjects, becoming particularly well known for his advocacy of dowsing.

“Actually it is quite devastating to realise how few people ever think at all. They mostly take their ideas from what they are told on the wireless, television, or in the newspapers, from people who are prepared to take a reasonable fee. To suggest anything different makes you tread on many corns of vested interest. No professional pathfinder likes you for doing it.”

Born in Somerset to a wealthy family, Lethbridge was educated at Trinity College, Cambridge, during the course of which he attended an expedition to Jan Mayen island, becoming part of the first group to successfully climb the Beerenberg.

After a failed second expedition to the Arctic Circle, he became involved in archaeology. In his capacity as Keeper of Anglo-Saxon Antiquities at the Cambridge University Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology, Lethbridge carried out excavations at various sites around Britain.

His claims regarding the existence of Iron Age hill figures on Wandlebury Hill in Cambridgeshire caused significant controversy within the archaeological community, with most archaeologists believing that Lethbridge had erroneously misidentified a natural feature. Lethbridge’s methodology and theories were widely deemed unorthodox, and in turn he became increasingly critical of the archaeological profession.

V. Gordon Childe , cultural, historical, archaeologist

Vere Gordon Childe (14 April 1892 – 19 October 1957) was an Australian archaeologist who specialized in the study of European prehistory. He spent most of his life in the United Kingdom, working as an academic for the University of Edinburgh and then the Institute of Archaeology, London. He wrote twenty-six books during his career. Initially an early proponent of culture-historical archaeology, he later became the first exponent of Marxist archaeology in the Western world.

Men cling passionately to old traditions and display intense reluctance to modify customary modes of behavior, as innovators at all times have found to their cost. The dead-weight of conservatism, largely a lazy and cowardly distaste for the strenuous and painful activity of real thinking, has undoubtedly retarded human progress.

Born in Sydney to a middle-class English migrant family, Childe studied classics at the University of Sydney before moving to England to study classical archaeology at the University of Oxford. There, he embraced the socialist movement and campaigned against the First World War, viewing it as a conflict waged by competing imperialists to the detriment of Europe’s working class. Returning to Australia in 1917, he was prevented from working in academia because of his socialist activism. Instead, he worked for the Labor Party as the private secretary of the politician John Storey.

Emigrating to London in 1921, he became librarian of the Royal Anthropological Institute and journeyed across Europe to pursue his research into the continent’s prehistory, publishing his findings in academic papers and books. In doing so, he introduced the continental European concept of an archaeological culture—the idea that a recurring assemblage of artefacts demarcates a distinct cultural group—to the British archaeological community.

From 1927 to 1946 he worked as the Abercromby Professor of Archaeology at the University of Edinburgh, and then from 1947 to 1957 as the director of the Institute of Archaeology, London. During this period he oversaw the excavation of archaeological sites in Scotland and Northern Ireland, focusing on the society of Neolithic Orkney by excavating the settlement of Skara Brae and the chambered tombs of Maeshowe and Quoyness. In these decades he published prolifically, producing excavation reports, journal articles, and books. With Stuart Piggott and Grahame Clark he co-founded The Prehistoric Society in 1934, becoming its first president. Remaining a committed socialist, he embraced Marxism, and—rejecting culture-historical approaches—used Marxist ideas such as historical materialism as an interpretative framework for archaeological data.

One of the best-known and most widely cited archaeologists of the twentieth century, Childe became known as the “great synthesizer” for his work integrating regional research with a broader picture of Near Eastern and European prehistory. He was also renowned for his emphasis on the role of revolutionary technological and economic developments in human society, such as the Neolithic Revolution and the Urban Revolution, reflecting the influence of Marxist ideas concerning societal development.

The bronze bust of Childe by Marjorie Maitland Howard has been kept in the library of the Institute of Archaeology since 1958. Childe thought it made him look like a Neanderthal.

Inigo Jones

Inigo Jones, (born July 15, 1573, Smithfield, London, Eng. —died June 21, 1652, London), British painter, architect, and designer who founded the English classical tradition of architecture. The Queen’s House (1616–19) at Greenwich, London, his first major work, became a part of the National Maritime Museum in 1937.

Portrait of Inigo Jones painted by William Hogarth in 1758 from a 1636 painting by Sir Anthony van Dyck

As the most notable architect in England,[2] Jones was the first person to introduce the classical architecture of Rome and the Italian Renaissance to Britain. He left his mark on London by his design of single buildings, such as the Queen’s House which is the first building in England designed in a pure classical style, and the Banqueting House, Whitehall, as well as the layout for Covent Garden square which became a model for future developments in the West End. He made major contributions to stage design by his work as theatrical designer for several dozen masques, most by royal command and many in collaboration with Ben Jonson.

“That Jones shall worship the god within him turns out ultimately to mean that Jones shall worship Jones. Let Jones worship the sun or moon, anything rather than the Inner Light; let Jones worship cats or crocodiles, if he can find any in his street, but not the god within. Christianity came into the world firstly in order to assert with violence that a man had not only to look inwards, but to look outwards, to behold with astonishment and enthusiasm a divine company and a divine captain. The only fun of being a Christian was that a man was not left alone with the Inner Light, but definitely recognized an outer light, fair as the sun, clear as the moon, terrible as an army with banners.”
Author: G.K. Chesterton

What did Inigo Jones design?
He left his mark on London by his design of single buildings, such as the Queen’s House which is the first building in England designed in a pure classical style, and the Banqueting House, Whitehall, as well as the layout for Covent Garden square which became a model for future developments in the West End.