Zumbi dos Palmares

Zumbi (1655 – November 20, 1695), also known as Zumbi dos Palmares (Portuguese pronunciation: [zbi dus pwmais]), was a quilombola chieftain and a Brazilian of Kongo ancestry.

He was one of the first to fight the Portuguese’s slave trade in Brazil. He was also the last of the Quilombo dos Palmares rulers, an Afro-Brazilian community in the present-day state of Alagoas, Brazil, that had freed itself from captivity in that same settlement.

The Expedições program this week resumes the history of Quilombo dos Palmares – a nation raised by black fled from various engenhos de açúcar da região Nordeste, e terra de Zumbi. Great leader of the fight for freedom, the leaf is planted as a symbol of resistance.


Paula Saldanha and Roberto Werneck document the historical site of the Serra da Barriga, in Alagoas, which went to the administrative headquarters of Palmares and interviewed Zezito Araújo, professor at the Federal University of Alagoas and two local managers. No documentary, it will be shown excerpts from the film Quilombo, by Cacá Diegues, as a beautiful reconstruction of what was born in Palmares.


Despite constantly invaded Portuguese hairs, or Quilombo dos Palmares resisted for a secular, gathering eleven mocambos and a population of more than twenty thousand people. From 1597 to 1694, when a great invasion and massacre occurred, Palmares was a symbol of resistance to the escravagista regime.
On November 20, 1695, Zumbi was killed, he began many fights. In all of Brazil, this date, commemorates the Black Consciousness Day.

In today’s Afro-Brazilian culture, Zumbi is regarded as a powerful emblem of resistance to the enslavement of Africans in Brazil’s colony. [1] He was married to Queen Dandara, who was also a strong fighter.

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